Episode 234: The Adventure

Episode 234: The Adventure

EPISODE 234

The Adventure

How to screw a film shoot and then fix it

About This Episide

You would think I would learn by now, that shooting with film requires a little bit of discipline.
Let me tell you a little story.
Went to our favourite park to unwind a bit, and maybe create some photographs.  It was sunset time, and it was cold.  I decided to take, what’s slowly becoming my favourite medium format camera, the Mamiya 645.  Took 2 lenses a wide angle russian 55mm adapted to Mamiya and a 210mm.  But in my infinite wisdom I swapped the prism finder to a chimney finder (the one you look down into the camera).  I really don’t know what I was thinking.  I knew that Mamiya doesn’t like cold, because the shutter is battery operated and I had problems before, when the camera would just seize mid shot.  So I knew I didn’t want to walk around too far with it.  But taking the chimney view finder was stupid, because you can’t shoot with in from the car.  Duh.

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Episode 233: The Perfect Picture

Episode 233: The Perfect Picture

About This Episide

Thank you to Clay for a response to my Replacements show on his Through My Lens podcast.
Just wanted to clarify that making these types of alterations is not good for starting photographers because it creates this precedent of shooting and fixing later in photoshop. This just creates a lazy photographer, who doesn’t pay any attention to camera or composition, because “everything can be fixed in photoshop”.  
This quote by Manuel Alvarez Bravo a Mexican photographer from the bygone era sums it up nicely:
“A photographer’s main instrument is his eyes. Strange as it may seem, many photographers choose to use the eyes of another photographer, past or present, instead of their own. Those photographers are blind.” 
– Manuel Alvarez Bravo
b. February 4, 1902
In this episode me and Dave discuss the idea of actually embracing the physical flaws in your cameras and lenses to create great images.  Be it flares, noise, or weird bokeh.  Each lens has it’s own characteristic which is good to learn and apply during your photographic process.  Some with flare when pointed at the sun, some will have more control by implementing a better lens design.  Some lenses have great bokeh, and some don’t.  The idea is to know what your lens characteristic is, and either avoid it if you can, or embrace it, making the images more interesting in the process.  

Some companies like Lensbaby create special imperfections in their lenses, to open your creativity.  They are a perfect example of embracing flaws and pushing you to be more creative.

So go ahead, embrace the flaws and be creative! Follow your own vision.

Talk to you next week!

 

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Episode 232: The Replacements

Episode 232: The Replacements

EPISODE 232

The Replacements

Replacing skies and lazy photographers

About This Episide

Replacing skies in landscape photography is a fairly big business these days.  Not only tutorials but people that will actually sell different sky images ready to replace your boring sky.  
Is this ethical? As photographers do have to make our images as true to the place we see or is it just for commercial purposes.  Why do we do this?
I mean photo journalists have strict guidelines on editing photos for new publications, but even these can be, and are taken out of context.  Depending what is on the image and how we can spin the story around the image.  Essentially is up to us to determine what is true and how fake the news are.
So in landscape photography this trend started a long time ago, and with the advent of better and better software, this has been used by more and more photographers.
What is alarming is 
  • new photographers fall into this idea, shoot now fix in photoshop later
  • create lazy photographers
But what if you are on vacation and cannot/will not return to the area for a very long time, or never?  Do you replace the sky of a beautiful landscape?  
  • You could be tarnishing your memories
  • 20 years later, looking at your images do you remember the sky being like that or something else?
Also are you doing this for yourself, or is it more commercial purpose (selling it on stock etc.) 
Do you have a moral obligation to tell others about the composite image?
Personally I’m conflicted about that.  
Peter Lik image with a huge moon with a clif and tree, and any knowlagable photographer would know it is a composite image.  But Lik was a while was maintaining that this was not a composite.  So essentially lying.
Maybe you don’t have to say that your images are composites, but if asked I think you should tell the truth.

Talk to you next week!

 

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Episode 231: Chatting Photographically with Antonio Rosario

Episode 231: Chatting Photographically with Antonio Rosario

EPISODE 231

Chatting photographically with Antonio M. Rosario

Salgado, light painting, and photography what better way to spend an hour!

Chatting Photographically with Antonio M. Rosario

by Mac Sokulski | Shutter Time

About This Episide

In this episode I’m joined with Antonio M. Rosario, and we chat about photobooks, especially Salgado “Genesis”.  I was able to borrow it from a local library, and the experience was beyond spectacular. You can get it for yourself here: https://www.amazon.com/Sebasti%C3%A3o-Salgado-GENESIS-Lelia-Wanick/dp/3836538725/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1548473100&sr=8-1&keywords=salgado 

Another thing I found is the 16 frameable prints which are images from the book: https://www.amazon.com/Salgado-Poster-Set-Sebasti%C3%A3o/dp/3836552701/ref=pd_rhf_cr_s_pd_crcd_0_9?_encoding=UTF8&pd_rd_i=3836552701&pd_rd_r=e956c2ed-0764-47c6-81c5-1022e864d11a&pd_rd_w=mtJOG&pd_rd_wg=XTPh3&pf_rd_p=c6269878-d677-4a89-a68c-ff0df2b6ce6c&pf_rd_r=ZX16NP13GYWSW7K70DR7&psc=1&refRID=ZX16NP13GYWSW7K70DR7

Light Paitin and a photographer that was kicked out of 500px, because his images weren’t photographic enough.  https://petapixel.com/2019/01/22/500px-nukes-photographer-for-photos-not-being-photographic-enough/

 Tim Gamble is a Manchester, UK-based photographer who uses light-painting techniques to create surreal and abstract artworks. His photos are almost entirely created in-camera, so imagine Gamble’s surprise when 500px unexpectedly deleted his account for “posting non-photographic content.”

This sparked out discussion about light painting and how much fun it is to try different techniques in photography.

Harold Ross: https://www.instagram.com/haroldross_sculptingwithlight/

 Talk to you next week!

 

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Episode 230: Sebastião Salgado

Episode 230: Sebastião Salgado

About This Episide

Born in 1944 in Brazil. Educated as an Economist which allowed him to better understand the human condition.  
He photographed people and their conditions. Salgado works on long term, self-assigned projects many of which have been published as books: The Other Americas, Sahel, Workers, Migrations, and Genesis. The latter three are mammoth collections with hundreds of images each from all around the world.  
Salgado is a truly amazing photographer that can teach us a lot about our world and ourselves.  He is a living legend, and I know that I feel a little shame that I never really paid much attention to him and his work.  
What can I say, both Dominick and me were in awe of the movie, and the images.  I think it shows in the conversation.  
Talk to you next week!

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