Episode 213 »» Alfred Stieglitz and promoting the work of others

Episode 213 »» Alfred Stieglitz and promoting the work of others

Alfred was a big promoter of photography, and creator of the first photography magazine “camera work” 
His celebrated portrait of Georgia O’Keeffe (1997.61.19) was one of his chief occupations between 1917 and 1925, during which time he made several hundred photographs of the painter (who became his wife in 1924). 
His refusal to encapsulate her personality into a single image was consistent with several modernist ideas: the idea of the fragmented sense of self, brought about by the rapid pace of modern life; the idea that a personality, like the outside world, is constantly changing, and may be interrupted but not halted by the intervention of the camera; and, finally, the realization that truth in the modern world is relative and that photographs are as much an expression of the photographer’s feelings for the subject as they are a reflection of the subject depicted.
PDFs of Camera Work issues: (very awesome)
Not only were photographs shown at his “291” gallery but paintings and other art as well (Picasso paintings, et al)
Camera Work, where Gertrude Stein published her first essay, marked a turning point for modern art. First created in 1902 and distributed in 1903 as a product of the Photo-Secession movement, the publication featured photogravures with text layouts based on the designs of William Morris, advertisements designed by Stieglitz and issues dedicated to prominent artists, including eventually, those outside the medium, like Picasso. “
Stieglitz’s objective, as he declared in the first issue, was to publish  “quarterly an illustrated publication which will appeal to the ever-increasing ranks of those who have faith in photography as a medium of individual expression.”
 Get the whole collection of Camera Work for $20!!!
 
Photographer, writer, publisher, and curator Alfred Stieglitz (1864–1946) was a visionary far ahead of his time. Around the turn of the 20th century, he founded the Photo-Secession, a progressive movement concerned with advancing the creative possibilities of photography, and by 1903 began publishing Camera Work, an avant-garde magazine devoted to voicing the ideas, both in images and words, of the Photo-Secession. Camera Work was the first photo journal whose focus was visual, rather than technical, and its illustrations were of the highest quality hand-pulled photogravure printed on Japanese tissue. 
Berenice Abbott purchases Eugène Atget’s estate:
In 1927 Berenice Abbot became the largest collector of Atget’s work when she purchased his estate. For the next forty years, Abbott devoted much of her creative life to popularizing Atget’s work. Our vision of Eugene Atget and Atget’s Paris was literally Abbott’s invention. Drawn from work in previously unpublished archives, this book details Abbott’s rare prints of Atget’s negatives for the first time.
Episode 212 »» How photography could be used for social change

Episode 212 »» How photography could be used for social change

Lewis Hine:

Colorized versions of his child labor images. Changes the feel entirely:
Library of Congress Collection:
Child labor in the early 20th century:
(this is a good summary story with a great selection of photos and captions)
“At the start of the 20th century, labor in America was in short supply, and laws concerning the employment of children were rarely enforced or nonexistent. While Americans at the time supported the role of children working on family farms, there was little awareness of the other forms of labor being undertaken by young hands.”
Some iconic photos:
Most iconic image:
“Hine produced one of his most iconic photos in “Sadie Phifer a cotton mill spinner, Lancaster, South Carolina” in 1908. Phifer was only 9 years old when Hine snapped the picture. She already had been working at the mill for a year and a half, putting in 11-hour shifts cleaning lint from the machinery and mending breaks in the thread. We see her before a long row of machinery that seems to go on forever. She is dwarfed by the industrial setting and seems small and frail against the hard steel background.”
“By 1908, Hine was producing some of his most powerful work when he officially left his teaching position and became the photographer for the National Child Labor Committee.
For the next 10 years he traveled the country and was often threatened with physical harm by factory police and foremen. Photography inside the factories was forbidden because child labor, as widespread as it was, was intended to be kept hidden from the public. Hine often resorted to wearing disguises, sometimes as a fire inspector, other times as a Bible salesman, and sneaked into factories to document child labor in the textile mills, coal mines and glass factories.”
Working as an investigative photographer for the National Child Labor Committee (NCLC), Lewis Hine (1874-1940) documented working and living conditions of children in the United States between 1908 and 1924. The NCLC photos are useful for the study of labor, reform movements, children, working class families, education, public health, urban and rural housing conditions, industrial and agricultural sites, and other aspects of urban and rural life in America in the early twentieth century.”
Photogs who affect social change:
Questions and points:
  1. What the difference between this kind of photography and documentary photography? They are the same or different? Certainly related.
  2. Photographers often can get grants for a photo project that will try to lead to social change.
  3. People who are in a position to affect change will more often than not be moved to action after seeing a powerful photo rather than just being told something is happening.
  4. So can we contribute to social change with out it being perceived as propaganda
_________
Shutter Time Goodness:
Sid’s Twitter » @supercellsid
Mac’s Twitter » @maclby
Episode 211 »» HDR Photography and Trey Ratcliff

Episode 211 »» HDR Photography and Trey Ratcliff

It seems that neither Mac nor Antonio are overly excited with the new Canon full frame mirrorless camera.  Canon R seems to be basically a smaller lighter Canon 5d series camera with out the mirror. https://fstoppers.com/originals/canon-screwed-again-new-r-camera-just-mirrorless-5d-mark-iv-285018 There are also rumours of Panasonic coming into the full frame mirrorless market.  With all these mirrorless cameras, does Fujifilm need to fill the gap in their current line up and introduce a full frame camera. https://www.cnet.com/news/rumored-panasonic-full-frame-mirrorless-reveal-on-sept-25-is-odd-but-plausible/

Featured Photographer: Trey Ratcliff

https://stuckincustoms.smugmug.com https://www.thearcanum.com Trey is a prolific photographer and educator.  One can say that he is a pioneer in HDR photography.  His early travel images, which started the HDR craze.  His latest big project is the Arcanum.  A photographic online school, with a twist.  It is setup almost like a game, where you level up in your photography, by being paired with a Master.  Completing challenges allows you to learn and level up.  This unique school launched in 2013 and it is still going strong.  

HDR or High Dynamic Range photography, has been around for a very long time.  Because of the early sensor technology did not allow for good dynamic range, this technique was widely used, especially in real estate photography.  Even with advent of new digital sensors and their increased dynamic range, and some cameras offering in camera HDR, this technique hasn’t disappeared from photography.

You can get a decent HDR image just from one RAW file, but you’ll have to use some layering and masking in Photoshop. And it will depend on the initial image and its exposure. 
HDR hides nothing. It leaves no part of the image hidden. All the mysteries are gone. If you looked at page after page of HDR images then suddenly came to a shot with lots of dark black shadows, your eyes will be so happy because now they have something to rest on: the shadows. 

Join the Convo

You can keep the conversation going and find our show notes and more by heading to shuttertimewithsidandmac.com, where you’ll find links to our Twitter accounts and links to subscribe to our show via Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, iHeartRADIO and Spotify. Of course, if you would like to support the show and help with some of the costs of running a podcast, you can check us out on Patreon and become a Shutter Time patron.

Links from the show

Canon HDR: https://cpn.canon-europe.com/content/education/infobank/digital_camera_features/in_camera_hdr.do Photomatix: https://www.hdrsoft.com/

_________
Shutter Time Goodness:
Sid’s Twitter » @supercellsid
Mac’s Twitter » @maclby
Episode 210 »» Documentary photography and its propaganda

Episode 210 »» Documentary photography and its propaganda

Apologizing to Bart for derailing his podcast plan, and staying up till wee hours of the night to get show notes ready, for his reply to Antonio’s question from ep. 209 about projects.  It’s fascinating episode of Bart’s journey through his photography projects. 

NEWS

PhaseOne 150Mpx medium format monster.  59k – pocket change!
53.4x40mm sensor size, which is almost the size of a smallest medium format film which is 60mmx45mm.

FEATURED PHOTOGRAPHER: Dorothea Lange

“Migrant Mother” by Dorothea Lange is perhaps the most famous FSA photograph, and one of the most famous photographs of all time. It portrays a mother and her two children looking exhausted and disheveled, and it encourages sympathy in the viewer (see figure 6). After taking this picture, Lange said, in an interview with Popular Photography that “[the mother] seemed to know that my pictures might help her, and so she helped me.” Lange explicitly points out that the presence of the camera changed the behavior of the woman. She even admitted in an interview that her photographs incorporate her own emotions and contain bias; “[A documentary photograph] is not a factual photograph per se. [It] carries with it another thing, a quality in the subject that the artist responds to.” Photographer’s bias is unavoidable; therefore no photograph can be completely factual.

Join the Convo

You can keep the conversation going and find our show notes and more by heading to shuttertimewithsidandmac.com, where you’ll find links to our Twitter accounts and links to subscribe to our show via Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, iHeartRADIO and Spotify. Of course, if you would like to support the show and help with some of the costs of running a podcast, you can check us out on Patreon and become a Shutter Time patron.

Links from the show

Donna Ferrato – https://www.icp.org/browse/archive/collections/donna-ferrato-living-with-the-enemy
Photographer Reveals Market, Not Truth, Behind Conflict Images: http://honestreporting.com/exposed-photographer-reveals-market-not-truth-behind-conflict-images/
Episode 209 »» Projects / series with Antonio M. Rosario

Episode 209 »» Projects / series with Antonio M. Rosario

Discarded Brooklyn by Antonio M. Rosario

News

New Nikon Z series, full frame mirrorless cameras are on the verge of being released to the world.  Mac and Antonio talk about this new, but very late addition to the mirrorless line up of cameras.  Over all we will not be selling our kidneys to go out and purchase these cameras.

Main Topic and Featured Photographer

In this episode our featured photographer is Duane Michals.  His work is very unique, and he works in series of images rather than one.  This has sparked the discussion on projects and series and how important are they to us as photographers.  Sometimes we find it difficult to express the whole story in one image, so creating a series of images that tell the story we want to express, can help us.

Michal’s Quote – “My pictures are more about questions, not about answers.”

Join the Convo

Do you find we are wasteful in photography? Do you have any examples where you have realized this yourself? We would love to hear about it. You can chime in and find us on here on the blog and on Twitter. You can also subscribe to Shutter Time show via Apple Podcasts, StitcheriHeartRADIO and SpotifyIf you would like to support the show and help with some of the costs of running this podcast, please check us out on Patreon (any and all support is appreciated!).

Thanks for tuning in, folks!

Cheers, y’all!

#changetheconversation

Links from the show

Nikon Z series –  https://www.theverge.com/circuitbreaker/2018/8/23/17768890/nikon-z7-z6-cameras-announced-pricing-features-release-date

Duane Michals – http://www.dcmooregallery.com/artists/duane-michals/series  https://www.lensculture.com/articles/duane-michals-storyteller-the-photographs-of-duane-michals-2

Ahae Through my Window series – http://ahae.com/about/